Book Spotlight: The Sweet Life in Paris

What a crazy week, I feel like I’m not the only one in that boat. Of a similar vein I find it hard these days to fit in much leisure reading, it usually translates to a very hopeful list and an overflowing bookcase. (I have a love hate relationship with Barnes and Noble for this reason.)

I just recently finished reading a book by David Lebovitz called The Sweet Life in Paris. The book allowed for a much enjoyed reconnection with my inner francophile. I’ve always loved Paris. The beautiful culture and tasty food win me over every time. This book was a culmination of two of my loves.

The book is a perfect marriage of his adventures of the American experience in Paris and delicious recipes. He takes you on a journey of him finding his footing for a new life in Paris and all the while getting the juicy bits about French culture and colloquialisms then closes out with a recipe. What more could you ask for?

It was a great read and I highly recommend it. You can pick it up from Amazon here. In the spirt of that, who would I be if I didn’t try one of those oh-so-tempting recipes. I decided to go with every girls favorite, the chocolate cake.

Chocolate Cake (From David Lebovitz)

9 ounces (250g) bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, chopped
8 tablespoons (120 g) unsalted butter
1/3 cup (65 g) sugar
4 large eggs, room temperature, seperated
2 tablespoons flour
pinch of salt

I find it’s always best to gather everything before hand, not just for photo purposes.
It helps to know if you’re missing something before hand.

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (180 C ). Butter a 9-inch (23cm) loaf pan and line the bottom with a strip of parchment paper.

2. In a large bowl set over a pan of simmering water, heat the chocolate and butter together until melted and smooth.

3. Remove from heat and stir in half the sugar, then the egg yolks, and flour.

4. Using an electric mixer or a whisk, begin whipping the egg whites with salt. Keep whipping until they start to work soft peak. Gradually whip in the remaining sugar until the whites are at hard peak.

5. Use a rubber spatula to fold one-third of the egg whites into the chocolate mixture to lighten it, then fold in the remaining egg whites just until the mixture is smooth and no visible white streaks remain.

6. Scrape the batter into the prepared loaf pan, smooth the top and bake for 35 minutes, just until the cake feel slightly firm in the center. Do no overbake.

7. Let the cake cool in the pan before serving.

Storage: The cake can be store for up to three days, or you can freeze it for up to one month. Make sure if freezing to wrap well.

My notes/advice: Use a mixer, not a whisk. I attempted this one just to see if I could and my arm nearly fell off. Thank technology and life will be easier. Separate eggs with your fingers, not the shells, it could decrease potential for any extra “goodies” that can come from exposure to the shell. Also make sure the chop your butter into small pieces when adding it to the chocolate, it will help it melt quicker. When testing to see if it’s done baking simply press on the top with your fingers, and try to avoid opening it early, doing so can cause the cake to fall. This cake comes out a bit looking like a brownie, at least to me, so I make some chocolate butter cream frosting to dress it up. For this you simply take some butter and whip it with a mixer and then sift in powdered sugar until you get your desired sweetness and texture. You can thin the frosting with cream. I also sifted in cocoa powered with the sugar to flavor it. (I used about 1 stick 8oz to 3 1/2 cups of sugar.) 

Enjoy!

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